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Her Heart Forms

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#ListHeart

Thank you to the lovely @s.lyons_ for taking to us about her work and how list poems are a wonderful way of exploring a theme, of making the incongruent – congruent and for helping with the creativity process in bringing a poem to the light. (Catchup on live for the next 24 hours). This week’s challenge is to write a list poem – by taking your favourite recipe and writing a poem inspired by it or in the style of the recipe. We were honoured to be the first to hear Shay’s poem inspired by roti and chicken curry. Submit your poems by Friday 27th July for a chance to be featured : 1. Follow @herheartforms & @herheartpoetry 2. Tag #herheartforms 3. Tag @herheartforms on your post 4. Tag #ListHeart and #makeblackoutpoetry on your post . Posts must be your original content. By tagging Her Heart Forms you are…

Her Heart Weekly Form: Rhupunt

Delving into our celtic roots with a classical Welsh form. The Rhupunt is one of the 24 different types of poetic meter, written in cynghanedd of varying complexity. There is a rhyming pattern of: aaab, cccb, dddb and so on, which can be displayed in stanzaic or in single line view. (i.e. 4 lines of aaab becomes one line) Traditionally speaking each line should be 4 syllables long but we won’t hold you to it. We’re focusing on the rhyming scheme! Head over to @TwoHeartsBeatStronger if you’d like to collaborate on a Rhupunt or on Celtic myth in general! Here’s an example from @palemanpoetry of a Rhupunt: Blades of grass like silver hair Masked by oceans hiding where No man could swim not set a snare for those who call it home. Yet in these tiniest of pools Newsian mages dwell with fools, Conjuring their gleaming jewels, while blade…

Best use of the Naani form

This week’s best use of the #NaaniHeart poetic form, with a perfect use of 20-25 syllables in 4 lines; and with each two line part of the poem having complete meaning of their own before uniting them in thought to complete the meaning; is @lunar_escapades with her bitter, sour, juicy sweet, ‘Love’s Lemons’. Well done Lunar, thanks for taking part! All winners of weekly challenges are automatically submitted to be considered ‘Her Heart On Best Form’, of which we will have various categories and one overall winner. Please contact the author for permission to repost @lunar_escapades. Her Heart Forms is part of the Her Heart Poetry family, focused on poetry forms. This tutorial style page will show you how to write different traditional and contemporary forms of poetry with the aim of helping you to improve your poetic craft.

NAANI With such rich culture and history spanning through all the yugas (ages of the world), with myriad languages, variation in landscape from sea to desert and lush jungle; India is our next stop and the Naani or Naneelu Teluga poem. India is no waltz, but a tango through the senses; from the smell of temple incense and jasmine to spice markets or mumbai traffic! Naani, or Naneelu, poems are a contemporary poetic form introduced in 2002 by eminent Indian poet and literary professor Dr N. Gopi in his book Naeelu. “Naneelu belong to you and to me – ‘na’ and ‘nee’ mean in Telugu ‘my’ and ‘your’ respectively, and the end ‘lu’ indicative of the plural number of the poems – in short, they belong to all of us.” Consisting of 4 lines, the total lines consists of a minimum of 20, and maxium of 25, syllables. Whilst not…

Found-Object

Found-Object poetry is a contemporary poetry form that is not only the individual act of writing, but a collaborative work between writer and reader.  Loosely based on Found-Object Art, a Found-Object Poem is a poem that is written by the poet, and then ‘left’ somewhere unexpected to be ‘found’ by the reader.  It is only when the poem is ‘found’ that it becomes a piece of art. Found-Object poems can be any form and rhyming is optional.  There is no set length, however given the constraints of space normally associated with this form, short works such as haiku, are often popular. A Found-Object poem normally has an uplifting and positive theme. Your challenge this week is to bring the magic of poetry to someone else’s day by creating a Found-Object poem.  To do this, you will write an uplifting poem, print it on paper and then leave that poem somewhere that it…

Nonet

A Nonet is a traditional form consisting of nine lines. The first line is nine syllables long. The following lines each decrease by one syllable, until the final, ninth line, which is one syllable. It can be on any subject and rhyming is optional.  You can see the form using the example poem as below: Line 1: He wades into the rhythm of life (9 syllables) Line 2: a sailor leaving childhoods shores (8 syllables) Line 3: for a siren’s silver call. (7 syllables) Line 4: Floating on melodies (6 syllables) Line 5: cresting, anchor cast (5 syllables) Line 6: into the depths (4 syllables) Line 7: of her salt (3 syllables) Line 8: covered (2 syllables) Line 9: skin. (1 syllable) For more examples of poems written using this form search the hashtag #nonetheart on Instagram, or visit Her Heart Forms here.

Renga

Renga, meaning linked poem, is a traditional Japanese poetry form from the genre of collaborative poetry. This form is written by two or more poets. Believed to be over 1000 years old renga evolved from tanka, the oldest form of Japanese poetry and consists of at least two ku or stanzas. The opening stanza of the renga, called the hokku, became the basis for the haiku form of poetry. To create a renga, one poet writes the first stanza, which is three lines long with a total of seventeen syllables, normally 5-7-5. The next poet adds the second stanza, a couplet with seven syllables per line, or 7-7. The third stanza repeats the structure of the first and the fourth repeats the second, alternating in this pattern until the poem’s end. You can see the syllable pattern in the example: Stanza 1 Line 1: view from my window (5 syllables)…

Triolet

A Triolet is a traditional poetry form that consists of one stanza that is eight lines long.  It has the rhyme scheme ABaAabAB, in which the first, fourth and seventh lines are the same and the second and eighth line are the same. In the example, we show you how this breaks down, and show you the rhyme scheme: Line 1 (A): Take me back to those yesterdays. Line 2 (B): When love, and life and I was new Line 3 (a): and full of easy, girl-child ways. Line 4 (A): Take me back to those yesterdays Line 5 (a): before carefree lost to lean-hipped sway Line 6 (b): before I gave me, stained-red to you. Line 7 (A): Take me back to those yesterdays, Line 8 (B): when love and life and I was new. This is a challenging form to write which encourages the poet to search for clarity and…

Limerick

Limericks are usually five-line poems which follow a rhyme scheme of AABBA (for those who don’t know, that means the first, second, and fifth lines rhyme with one another, and the third and fourth lines rhyme). On top of that, limericks are almost always either funny or crude (often both), although to be fair, humor is in the ear of the listener, so don’t take this guideline too seriously. Here’s an example for you with the rhyming pattern identified: Once I found fish in the sky (A) Who bubbled as they floated by, (A) But the second I blinked (B) They swam down the sink (B) With garbage disposal on ‘high. (A) Very often, the third and fourth lines of a limerick are shorter than the others, and they’re commonly written in anapestic meter (check out my next article to learn what that means), but as with all things artistic,…

Lanturne

The Lanturne (also known as the Lanterne and Lantern) is a five line poem originating from Japan. It has the syllable pattern 1,2,3,4,1. Once the poem is written, the words are centered on the line to create the shape of a Japanese lantern. Thus giving the form it’s name. Our example  is written by community member, Molly Murray ǀ @the_atelier_project. For more examples of poems written using this form search the hashtag #LanturneHeart on Instagram, or visit our community here.