Category

Writing Prompts

Category

Starting Over – A Writing Prompt

This week we’ve been focusing on syllables, and we’ve even learned a new poetic form to fit that focus. In honor of that newfound knowledge, your challenge for the week is to write a carlito poem – you guessed it – about starting over. You can write from the perspective of someone starting over in life, starting over after messing up a recipe, or you could even write about what it would be like for the earth itself to reset. I’m purposely leaving the subject matter wide open to artistic interpretation, so write it as you see fit, but remember: A carlito poem should be formatted as follows: -10 lines in total: Line One: 1 syllable Line Two: 2 syllables Line Three: 3 syllables… …and so on up through line seven Lines 8-10: A haiku -The haiku can be traditional or conventional, but it must follow the typical 5-7-5 syllable…

#HeartWrds ǀ Prompt 57

Can you tap into the feelings of exclusion? Or on the reverse side, can you bring hope and inclusion? This week’s prompt challenges you to think like an ‘outcast’ and write a poem on this theme. If you would like to see examples of poems written about this prompt than simply search the hashtag #heartwrds on Instagram, visit our community, or visit the @heartwrds gallery.

#HeartWrds ǀ Prompt 56

This week your challenge is to write a poem on the theme of ‘wonder woman’. This may be a literal interpretation about the superhero, or a more subtle interpretation about the wonder women in your life. If you would like to see examples of poems written about this prompt than simply search the hashtag #heartwrds on Instagram, visit our community, or visit the @heartwrds gallery.

#HeartWrds ǀ Prompt 55

Can you write a poem using all of these words without writing about a disease or illness? If you would like to see examples of poems written about this prompt than simply search the hashtag #heartwrds on Instagram, visit our community, or visit the @heartwrds gallery.

#HeartWrds ǀ Prompt 54

Share your vision of equality with your reader? This prompt asks you to dig down deep for the your own truth and to share that with your reader through strong imagery and excellent construction. If you would like to see examples of poems written about this prompt than simply search the hashtag #heartwrds on Instagram, visit our community, or visit the @heartwrds gallery.

#HeartWrds ǀ Prompt 52

This week your challenge is to write a poem on the theme of a second chance. If you would like to see examples of poems written about this prompt than simply search the hashtag #heartwrds on Instagram, visit our community, or visit the @heartwrds gallery.

#HeartWrds ǀ Prompt 50

We did it for Christmas and we are doing it again! This time, it is in honour of the birth and death of The Bard, William Shakespeare (23 April) and sharing the magic of poetry with the globe! Your challenge this week is to write your own original poetry inspired by a quote, poem or piece of writing by Shakespeare. You can also copy your favourite quote from Shakespeare, if the Muse eludes you. Once you have your poem, you need to handwrite it, or print it out, and leave it somewhere that someone else will find it. This might be a library, bus stop, on the train, in a coffee shop, on a colleague’s desk at work or similar. Then you will take a photo of the poem, in it’s location, and post it to your account, with the hashtag #popupglobalpoetry. The purpose of the challenge is to share…

#HeartWrds ǀ Prompt 49

This week your challenge is to write a 17 syllable poem, based loosely on the structure of a haiku. Haiku is the traditional Japanese art of “seizing the moment” with 17 syllables. Appealing to the senses, showing the imperceptible, suggesting something bigger than one can see, it relies on the notion of cutting (kiru) where two images or ideas are juxtaposed against one another by a cutting word (kireji) which acts as verbal punctuation mark. A haiku is traditionally arranged in three lines, of 5, 7, 5 syllables and it should have a reference to a season of the year. In general the last line of the haiku should create an effect, surprising, scary, inspiring, or similar. A title is optional, although it can bring an additional layer of meaning and surprise. To introduce to the notion of syllables we will be playing on this form and taking a modern approach to…